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Esmeralda Swartz

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Top Stories by Esmeralda Swartz

In Part 1, I looked at what could be behind Facebook's acquisition of WhatsApp and subsequent purchase of Oculus Rift. How are these seemingly different acquisitions related? There is no question that both Facebook and Google are in a race to build the next-generation computing/communications platform (after mobile) and the battle lines are being drawn between the over-the-top (OTT) players and telecommunications companies. After all, both Facebook and Google count on telcos to deliver services to their customer base. How will the WhatsApp and Oculus Rift acquisitions shape Facebook and impact the rest of the market including Google and mobile? Facebook did not pay $19 billion for WhatsApp simply because it's an SMS replacement, a Skype and Twitter competitor, because it could grow its international subscriber base, or could attract customers among the coveted mil... (more)

Stay Current on the Internet of Things

What Internet of Things (IoT) technology is of most interest to you? Do you currently use any IoT applications or IoT-based products? What challenges do you predict IoT will face? Is your business considering any IoT offerings? You're invited to MetraTech's monthly Twitter chat to discuss these questions and more. As of Tuesday, June 17, MetraTech will host a monthly Twitter chat for individuals interested in machine-to-machine (M2M) and IoT topics. During these chats, we'll help keep you current on news, events and happenings within the IoT market, and give you a platform to exp... (more)

Facebook Plays Short and Long Game with WhatsApp and Oculus Rift | Part 1

When Facebook decided to invest a cool $19 billion ($16 billion upfront) for messaging app WhatsApp the entire world was bound to take notice. Telecommunications types, in particular, were keen to understand how this latest move would impact them as mobile operators have been feeling the heat from over the top (OTT) players like Google and Facebook for years. (To put this $19 billion in perspective, AT&T, one of the world's largest telecom carriers, invests about $20 billion in networks and spectrum in an entire year.) Shortly thereafter, in another surprise move and with the dus... (more)

Why Did AT&T Enter the OTT Market and Streaming Video Business?

When the U.S. Appeals Court struck down the Open Internet Order's rules that prohibit Internet service providers (ISPs) from site-blocking and providing preferential service, the debate surrounding the true definition of an open and unfettered Internet reached fever pitch. Most of the large access providers in the U.S. are subsidiaries of traditional telecom carriers and cable companies. These companies fought hard for this ruling, so it is reasonable to expect that they already had their strategies in place and plans drawn up for the investments that will be needed to rebuild th... (more)

Living with “Fast” and “Slow” Internet Lanes: FCC Votes in Favor

The Internet has been buzzing over the recent news of a federal proposal that creates the equivalent of "slow" and "fast" lanes online. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted on Thursday, May 15, 3-2 in favor of a new proposal that enables the creation of Internet fast lanes, where broadband and cable providers such as Comcast can charge companies like Netflix, Amazon, YouTube and other over-the-top (OTT) providers to pay for priority traffic over a fast lane. The original FCC Open Internet Order of 2010 didn't declare that Internet Service Providers (ISPs) were common... (more)